Upperlands woman in

Added: Maryam Siniard - Date: 04.05.2022 00:00 - Views: 32577 - Clicks: 6489

Employment in Ireland during the 17 th to 19 th century was dominated by the Linen profession. At its peak the linen trade would have supported almost 50, linen factory workers across the province. Life in the mills was a hard life. Days were long and the work was hard.

Upperlands woman in

Work Upperlands woman in in the summer at 7 a. For the people of Upperlands, linen making is a deeply rooted profession. It is woven into their genetics. The Clarks of Maghera, have passed down the knowledge and secrets of weaving and manufacturing from father to son for centuries. Each generation learning the trade the same as any other in the mill and at the market. He gained the knowledge and ability to read the cloth with the hard-nosed men at the market. Although the life of a linen factory worker was hard in the 18 th century, there was no complaint at Upperlands.

People worked long and hard when the river was full and the weather was fine. Then there was time to rest when weather conditions meant the cloth could not be rested. William like the Clarks before him had always had a good working relationship with his co-workers. Knowledge of machinery was expanding with new innovations, increasing production capabilities.

Notable inventions were the creation of a new drying technique, using cones that allowed the wet spun linen yarns to dry faster. One boy working on a Schweiter winding machine could do the work of nine girls using the old skill of winding on the hanks. Weaving experienced ificant advances during the period. Traditionally weaving was done by hand on a manual operated wheel. Advances had also been made in the areas of bleaching and dying.

Introduction of these processes enabled the mill to bring more production inside and increase turnaround. ly difficult tasks such as moving railway wagons with bar and ropes were replaced with lorries that could transport and move coal with ease.

Upperlands woman in

Adapted across the linen factory to be able to move other goods around the property, increasing speed and efficiency. One thing that never changed over the centuries during life at the linen factory was the community. These employees were hardworking and loyal.

Stories and tales have been documented and told over the centuries, about the men and women of Upperlands. Each member of the linen factory worked hard through the toughest of years in the province.

Upperlands woman in

The story of Sam Averill is just one of many tales. A boilerman at the linen factory, who it was said shovelled over 57, tons of coal during his time at the linen factory. The community was driven with a passion for their craft and a loyalty to the family. As other factories closed, William Clark and Sons continued on. Production is ongoing at the factory to this day and now looks much different than the linen factory of the 18 th and 19 th century.

Introducing new aspects and customers to our business. We are a close community of versatile and skilled craftsmen.

Upperlands woman in

The knowledge of reading and knowing the fabric is still very much a part of the trade today. This knowledge and our heritage, makes us masters of the craft and is one of the reasons our fabric is sought after and exported across the globe. Data Protection Policy. From Dungiven to Upperlands — From weaving to beetling September 26th, June Clark — May 8th, Official Statement on the fire at William Clark February 27th, Modern furnishing brand Earthed by William Clark launches October 7th, Living in Linen- Arca Preservation September 9th, Deciding to go Digital- Duncan Neil September 2nd,

Upperlands woman in

email: [email protected] - phone:(524) 961-5630 x 1950

Maghera woman Leanne Dripps dies in Kilrea crash